The Foundation for Constitutional Democracy

02-Dec-2009

The Likud Is Dead: And So Is Politics

Filed under: Party StructuresIsrael's Nationals — eidelberg @ 7:33 am Edit This

Published in 2003.

When the present writer states that the Likud Party is dead, the sensible reader will understand that I am speaking metaphorically. The Likud is “dead” despite its having won 38 seats in the January 2003 Knesset elections, and despite the probability that it will form the government after the next election.

Yes, the Likud is dead, very dead, by which the well-informed and sensitive readers will understand that the Likud is intellectually moribund on the one hand, and heartless on the other. That it is intellectually moribund is obvious: The Likud is still crawling on Labor’s Oslo track, only now it is called the “Road Map” or “Unilateral Separation or Disengagement.” The fact that the Likud has even made overtures to Syria regarding the Golan Heights—Syria, a terrorist state and patron of Hezbollah—clearly indicates that the leaders of the Likud are “brain dead.”

The morally sensitive observer will recognize that the Likud (and not only the Likud) is heartless or spineless because it has tolerated the murder of some 800 Jews and the wounding and maiming of 6,000 more, in consequence of which countless thousands of Jewish children are suffering from post-traumatic shock syndrome. (more…)

01-Dec-2009

A Legacy of Betrayal

Filed under: Party StructuresZionism/Nationalism — eidelberg @ 7:21 am Edit This

I think any person that joins or votes Likud because it is reputed to be a Zionist party has been deceived or, if he or she is religious, is suffering from cognitive dissonance. The professed Zionism of the Likud has nothing to do with the original meaning of “Zion.” Likud Zionism is based on the Gentile or European concept of territorial nationalism—and not on the Torah. Conceptually speaking, Likud Zionism is not just a fraud; it is a degradation of one of the most sacred words in the dictionary of authentic Judaism.

As informed Jews know, Zion is the dwelling place of God’s glory. It is the Sanctuary of the Torah, the Holy City which surrounds it, the Holy Land of which Jerusalem is the eternal capital. From Zion, from Jerusalem, the word of God—the Truth—shall come forth.

Contrast the deeds of the Likud. Unless I am mistaken, a Likud-led government was the first to negotiate with Arab terrorists who claim the Land of Israel as theirs. It was the “Zionist” or “nationalist” Likud Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir that tacitly recognized the PLO at the Madrid Conference in October 1991. It was this tough-minded “Zionist” that initiated the practice of releasing Arab terrorists for captured Israeli soldiers. Many of these terrorists went on to murder more Jews. (more…)

30-Nov-2009

Israel’s Existential Dilemma

Filed under: Party StructuresIsrael’s Sovereignty — eidelberg @ 7:55 am Edit This

Edited transcript of the Eidelberg Report, Israel National Radio, November 30, 2009. With a note of thanks to Eleonora Shifrin, Executive Director of the Foundation for Constitutional Democracy, for prompting me to analyze the dilemma discussed in this report.

Part I

Israel has been suffering from a democratic form of statism—fascism with a human face. Let me explain via the great philosopher-mathematician Alfred North Whitehead, who said “The Jews are the first people that refused to worship the State.” This suggests that the Jews are the first people to recognize a “Higher Law,” one that transcends the laws of the State. Israel today has abandoned this tradition.

The idea of a law that transcends the acts of parliaments and kings inspired America’s Founding Fathers: it justified their revolution against Britain in 1776. Christian America is therefore spiritually indebted to the Jewish people—to say nothing of Jews like Haim Solomon who helped finance that revolution. Let’s be more specific. (more…)

14-Jul-2009

The Likud: A Dead Man Walking

Filed under: Party StructuresPoliticiansZionism/Nationalism — eidelberg @ 10:25 pm Edit This

The Likud is a dead man walking, and no one can enliven that intellectually sterile party. This means that political Zionism is dead. It died in May 1996 when Benjamin Netanyahu was elected prime minister and said his government would abide by the Oslo or Israel-PLO Agreement which the Labor Party had foisted on the nation in September 1993.

Unknown to the general public, Oslo presaged the establishment of an Arab-Islamic state in the Land of Israel, a state Netanyahu unlawfully sanctified on June 14, 2009 at Bar-Ilan University. Let us probe the little known perfidious nature of the Likud via political Zionism.

It never entered the minds of political Zionists that the return of the Jews to the Land of Israel was to culminate in the construction of the Third Temple and the restoration of Jewish law. The founders of political Zionism, such as Herzl and Pinsker, started from the failure of liberalism to solve the Jewish problem, but continued to see the solution in liberal terms, as a merely human problem. As Leo Strauss has written:

The terrible fate of the Jews was in no sense to be understood any longer as connected with divine punishment for the sins of our fathers or with the providential mission of the chosen people and hence to be borne with the meek fortitude of martyrs. (more…)

13-Jul-2009

An American Patriot in Israel

Filed under: JudaismParty StructuresMulticulturalism/Moral Relativism — eidelberg @ 6:02 am Edit This

Edited transcript of the Eidelberg Report, Israel National Radio, July 13, 2009.

More than forty years have elapsed since I wrote “The Crisis of Our Times,” which was printed in The Congressional Record (U.S. Senate, July 31, 1968, pp. E.7150-E.7157).

The article revealed that the doctrine of moral relativism permeates all levels of education in America and even influences decisions of its Supreme Court. I warned that moral relativism was undermining America’s political heritage and that it would lead to America’s demise. Enter Barack Obama, the first moral relativist in the White House. Before continuing, I had better define relativism.

Moral relativism (like cultural relativism) denies the validity of any standards by which to determine what is good or bad, right or wrong, just or unjust. Hence there are no rational or objective standards by which to determine whether the way of life of one individual, group, or nation is intrinsically superior to that of another.

Former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations John Bolton quotes Obama as saying: “I believe in American exceptionalism, just as I suspect that the Brits believe in British exceptionalism and the Greeks believe in Greek exceptionalism.” “This answer,” says Bolton “proves precisely the opposite of what Obama is ostensibly saying. (more…)

07-Jul-2009

A Thought Experiment for Right-Thinking People

Filed under: Party StructuresPoliticians — eidelberg @ 7:00 am Edit This

Suppose Likud chairman Benjamin Netanyahu had campaigned for the premiership by advocating the “two-state solution,” hence a Palestinian state. The Likud would surely have won far less than the 27 seats it garnered in the February election—perhaps little more than one-third of that number. Certainly the party would have been in a shambles.

In fact, it was reported in The Jerusalem Post (July 7) that 11 Likud MKs—Tzipi Hotovely, Environmental Protection Minister Gilad Erdan, Diaspora Affairs Minister Yuli Edelstein, deputy ministers Ayoub Kara and Gile Gamliel, and Danny Danon, Miro Regev, Tzion Pinyan, Carmel Shama, Yariv Levin and Ze’ev Elkin—have signed a letter to Netanyahu stating: “As Likud members, we cannot support a two-state solution on principle.” “[Such a solution] is neither possible, nor proper, due to the moral right of the Jewish people to the land, and for reasons of security. Saying otherwise delegitimizes the Israeli struggle for the land.”

Surely this expressed the views of some other Likud MKs, for example, Knesset Speaker Reuven Rivlin. Hence, it would be reasonable to assume that the Likud would have been devastated in the February election had Netanyahu been forthright with the people of Israel by saying he was for a Palestinian state. This means that Mr. Netanyahu’s premiership is based on a dastardly lie.

Would the Kadima party have benefited from the truth? (more…)

24-Dec-2008

The February Knesset Elections

Filed under: Party StructuresRepresentation — eidelberg @ 6:18 am Edit This

The press reports that 43 parties are registered to run in Israel’s February 10, 2009 Knesset elections. This absurd phenomenon is the direct consequence of Israel’s (divisive) parliamentary electoral system.

As I have frequently pointed out, Israel, contrary almost all other reputed democracies, makes the country a single electoral district in which a multiplicity of party slates compete for Knesset seats on the basis Proportional Representation. This multiplicity of parties is compounded by Israel’s low electoral threshold, now 2%.

Although the Foundation for Constitutional Democracy prefers personal and direct election of Knesset members, the very least the next Knesset can do is to raise the electoral threshold, say to 4%. This would effectively eliminate most parties and compel others to run on a joint list.

A 4% threshold—once proposed by the late MK Rehavim Ze’evi—would probably lead to four party coalitions: a left-center coalition, a right-center coalition, a religious coalition, and an Arab coalition. Running on a joint list would tend to enlarge the mentality of each of the parties composing a coalition, since they would have to campaign on a common party platform. (more…)

“You Can’t Make A Crooked Line Straight”

Filed under: JudaismParty StructuresZionism/Nationalism — eidelberg @ 5:47 am Edit This

Edited transcript of the Eidelberg Report, Israel National Radio, December 22, 2008.

The Sages say, “You can’t make a crooked line straight.” This prompted the present writer to warn a reputedly right-minded organization against joining the Likud Party some ten years ago. This was before 23 Likud MKs betrayed the nation by voting for “unilateral disengagement” from Gaza in 2004—a policy rejected by a vast majority of the public in the 2003 election.

The Likud government’s expulsion of Gaza’s 8,000 Jewish residents was called a crime by Professor Benzion Netanyahu. He said this despite the fact that his son Binyamin was a minister in that government. The same crime would be re-enacted if Dan Meridor, who recently rejoined the Likud, prevails in a projected Likud-led government to yield the Golan Heights to Syria.

But what is there about the Likud that prompts the title of this article? To answer this question, I turn to Israel’s first and illustrious Chief Rabbi, Abraham Isaac Hakohen Kook.

The Likud is rooted in secular Zionism, in Theodor Herzl’s tract The Jewish State. Herzl severed Judaism from public law and relegated the Torah to the home and the synagogue. (more…)

10-Nov-2008

Treason and Multiparty Cabinet Government

Filed under: Foreign PolicyParty StructuresPoliticiansIsrael’s Sovereignty — eidelberg @ 7:41 am Edit This

The present writer is repeatedly asked to discuss the pernicious character of Israel’s system of multiparty cabinet government. Many concerned citizens appalled by a political system in which the cabinet consists of the leaders of five or six or more rival political parties.

It is obvious to my interlocutors that the leaders of such a cabinet, far from being animated by a coherent, resolute, and long-term national program, are primarily motivated by their own personal and partisan interests, which means they compete with each other for political power and a larger share of the public treasury. This self-aggrandizement fosters public cynicism, which of course undermines the people’s confidence in their government.

What is not widely known, however, is that multiparty cabinet government also conduces to treason. To illustrate, let us go back to 1988. A so-called National Unity Government was then in power. The coalition agreement specified that Likud chairman Moshe Shamir would hold the post of Prime Minister for the first two years of the Government’s tenure, that Labor chairman Shimon Peres would be PM for the second two years, and that during Shamir’s tenure, Peres would hold the post of Finance Minister.

Bearing this in mind, let us now recall certain heated altercations that took place in an August 1989 session of the Knesset’s Foreign Affairs and Defense Committee. (more…)

31-Oct-2008

A New American Party

Filed under: Democratic MethodsParty StructuresUS & Global Policy — eidelberg @ 6:15 am Edit This

In view of the moral and intellectual bankruptcy of America’s two major political parties, and regardless of the outcome of the November election, I urge Christian Zionists, religious Jews, and those dedicated to the Natural Rights doctrine of the Declaration of Independence and the American Constitution to form a new political party—to organize branches in every State of the Union to compete in the midterm elections of 2010.

Prof. Paul Eidelberg, President

19-Sep-2008

The Mother of All Frauds

Filed under: Democratic MethodsParty StructuresOslo/Peace ProcessPoliticians — eidelberg @ 5:59 am Edit This

On September 17, Kadima, the ruling party of Ehud Olmert’s coalition government, held an election to determine who would replace him as Israel’s Prime Minister. The election was won by Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni, portrayed in the media as “Mrs. Clean.” The previous day, Caroline Glick, deputy managing editor of The Jerusalem Post, wrote: “Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni may not be a crook, but she is a fraud … just one fraudulent election away from becoming our next prime minister.” [View article.]

As we shall see, however, Livni is not the mother of all frauds—merely one of its many children.

Glick sees that “unlike all the other party primaries that have been held over the years, the Kadima primary is designed not as a preparatory step ahead of general elections to the Knesset. Rather, it is intended to replace general elections.”

Having won that primary, Livni will have 42 days to put together a ruling coalition. Failure to do so would mean a new general election in early 2009, a year and a half ahead of schedule. Olmert, who is a crook as well as a fraud, will remain as a caretaker leader until a new coalition is approved by the Knesset. (more…)

18-Aug-2008

Israel: From War and Servitude to Freedom

Filed under: Party StructuresOslo/Peace ProcessPoliticiansIsrael’s Sovereignty — eidelberg @ 8:17 pm Edit This

Edited transcript of the Eidelberg Report, Israel National Radio, 18 August 2008.

Fools aside, everyone knows that Israel is at war with the Palestinian Authority. Whatever the machinations of Fatah-leader Mahmoud Abbas and Hamas-leader Ismail Haniyah, both villains are committed to Israel’s annihilation.

That many of Israel’s own Arab citizens have long been participating in this war against the Jews has been ignored by various Israeli governments, Left and Right—if I may use these obsolete terms. Arabs freely traverse the roads assaulting Jewish vehicles; they brazenly fly the flag of PLO; and the Olmert-Livni-Mofaz government blinks.

Sderot has been depopulated, Iranian weapons flow into Gaza and are smuggled thence to Judea and Samaria. Soon every city in Israel may become another Sderot, and the Olmert-Livni-Mofaz government blinks.

This cockamamie government is just a collection of political liars and crooks—Likud turncoats and other hacks paid by the overtaxed citizens of Israel. (more…)

04-Aug-2008

Assimilation and Jewish Identity

Filed under: Democratic MethodsJudaismParty StructuresPoliticians — eidelberg @ 8:00 pm Edit This

Eidelberg Report, Israel National Radio, August 4, 2008.

 

PART I.

A major cause of assimilation in Israel, as well as in the United States, is the simple fact that Israel’s system of government is devoid of any Jewish character; each branch of Israeli government conflicts with Jewish principles. Multiparty cabinet government is not only a political monstrosity; it violates the concept of a Unitary Executive affirmed in the Torah and the Talmud. (See Rashi’s commentary to Deut. 31:7, quoting Sanhedrin 8a.)

Equally flagrant, members of the Legislature, the Knesset, are subservient to their party leaders. Nothing Jewish about this. (See Exod. 18:21 and Deut. 1`:13.) To this add the multicultural, hence anti-Jewish agenda of Israel’s Supreme Court, whose rulings often violate the abiding beliefs and values of the Jewish people.

Israel’s non-Jewish and anti-Jewish system of governance therefore fosters assimilation and undermines Jewish identity—whatever that means. Under such governance, Israel’s ruling elites cannot relate their public statements and policies to the sacred sources of Judaism or to the teachings of Israel’s great rabbis and philosophers. Jewish history is eviscerated while Jews are humiliated every day by the crass and irrational behavior of their ruling elites. (more…)

17-Jul-2008

Toward Respectable Political Parties

Filed under: Constitution & RightsDemocratic MethodsParty Structures — eidelberg @ 9:41 pm Edit This

Edted transcript of the Eidelberg Report, Israel National Radio, July 14, 2008.

The classic definition of party was set forth by that great 18th century philosopher-statesman Edmund Burke: “Party is a body of men united, for promoting by their joint endeavours, the national interest, upon some particular principle in which they are all agreed.”

By definition, a party represents only a part of the whole. While its members present their party principle as conducive to the national interest or the common good, they inevitably criticize the principles of other parties as not conducive to the common good, but they don’t necessarily impugn the integrity of their adversaries. For Burke, respectable parties must consist of “honest men of principle.”

Parties exist because men have different interests and conflicting opinions concerning such ends of government as justice and security, liberty and equality, prosperity and public morality. And of course such differences thrive in democracies.

Democracy, however, stands on the principle of “one adult, one vote.” One adult, one vote is virtually equivalent to “one opinion, one vote,” which suggests that democracy conduces to moral relativism. This is what decent people in democracies have yet to see: that democracy, as understand in this era of secularism, provides no objective justification for decency! Enough to mention the pornography and perversions now legalized in virtually all democratic countries. (more…)

08-Jul-2008

Are There No Men In The Knesset?

Filed under: Democratic MethodsParty StructuresPoliticians — eidelberg @ 5:45 am Edit This

The present writer received the following report from Israel National News:

“Winograd Panel Member: Why is Olmert Still PM?”

Winograd Committee member Professor Yehezkel Dror wrote in the New York Jewish Forward that Prime Minister Ehud Olmert would not still be in power “in any other parliamentary democracy.” The five-member Winograd panel was appointed by the Olmert government to conduct an inquiry into conduct of the Second Lebanon War.

“As found by the commission, the Prime Minister misdirected the war, showing a serious lack of strategic thinking,” Prof. Dror wrote in the left-leaning Forward. “The Defense Minister [Amir Peretz] was ignorant about defense issues. The Cabinet and its committees did not really know what they were deciding most of the time…. The chief of staff imposed a wrong doctrine. The army was not well prepared.

“As a member of the commission, I expected that the Cabinet would resign or be dismissed after the interim report appeared. Indeed, the chief of staff honorably resigned, and the minister of defense was made to leave. The prime minister, however, did not resign, nor was he forced to leave…. Having a highly qualified defense minister helps but cannot make up for the lack of a prime minister with a strategic mind, however good his political mind may be.” (more…)

08-Apr-2008

Beneath the Fear of Democracy

Filed under: Democratic MethodsIslam & ArabParty Structures — eidelberg @ 5:44 am Edit This

Eidelberg Report, Israel National Radio, April 7, 2008.

Part I

In Caroline Glick’s article “Fear of Democracy” (The Jerusalem Post, April 4), we learn that the UN’s Human Rights Counsel instructed its expert on freedom of expression to report to the Council on all instances in which individuals “abuse” their freedom of speech by giving expression to racial or religious bias. Since Egypt and Pakistan proposed this resolution, it was surely intended to stifle criticism of Islam.

This attempt to stifle freedom of expression, as Glick observes, violates Article 19 of the UN Declaration of Human Rights, which states: “Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.”

The European members of the Council failed to oppose an Islamic inspired resolution that violates, as Glick says, “one of the most basic tenets of Western civilization.” (more…)

07-Apr-2008

The Likud and Toppling the Olmert Government

Filed under: EthicsParty StructuresCURRENT ISSUES — eidelberg @ 3:28 am Edit This

Before pondering the title of this short article, please read those sections of Israel’s Penal Law defining acts that constitute treason:

  1. the category of acts which “impair the sovereignty” of the State of Israel—section 97(a);

  2. the category of acts which “impair the integrity” of the State of Israel— section 97(b);

  3. the category of acts under section 99 which give assistance to an “enemy” in war against Israel, which the Law specifically states includes a terrorist organization;

  4. the category of acts in section 100 which evince an intention or resolve to commit one of the acts prohibited by sections 97 and 99. (more…)

07-Jan-2008

Cops and Coddlers Revisited

Filed under: Party StructuresPoliticiansYamin Israel Party — eidelberg @ 7:53 am Edit This

Yamin Israel is often asked why it does not form an alliance with nationalist elements of the Likud. After all, doesn’t the Likud represent “the trunk of the nation,” as one prominent Likud member has emphasized?” Hasn’t Yamin Israel always sought to form a united front of nationalist groups? Aren’t Likud hawks like Moshe Arens tried-and-true nationalists?

These questions reminded me of an article I wrote in 1989, “Cops and Coddler.” It was during the first Intifada, and in power was a Shamir-led national unity government. A slightly shortened version of the article follows:

On 6 February 1989, Prime Minister Shamir declared, “The time has come for the world to finally understand that Eretz Yisrael can only belong to the State of Israel. Anything else is inconceivable.”

Four day later, Shamir’s statement was contradicted by his Foreign Minister, Moshe Arens: (more…)

05-Sep-2007

The Norwegian Scam

Filed under: Democratic MethodsParty StructuresPoliticiansRepresentation — eidelberg @ 4:47 am Edit This

Edited transcript of the Eidelberg Report, Israel National Radio, September 3, 2007.

The Norwegian scam is another name for the Norwegian Law now sponsored by Minister Avigdor Lieberman and Prime Minister Ehud Olmert. Applied to Israel, the Norwegian Law would require Knesset members who become cabinet ministers to resign their seats, which will be filled by others members on their respective party’s electoral list. The Knesset would thus retain 120 members to focus on legislation and would have no ministerial responsibilities.

However, since the MKs who become cabinet ministers remain the leaders of their respective parties, Israel will remain plagued by multi-party cabinet government, only now the public will have to pay the salaries and perks for at least 24 more MKs—and that’s a lot of money.

As I have often pointed out, the system of multi-party cabinet government is intrinsically divisive, inept, and conducive to corruption. (more…)

28-Aug-2007

Why Rabbis Should Not Enter Politics

Filed under: JudaismParty Structures — eidelberg @ 5:47 am Edit This

Rabbis should not run for political office. Why not? Because politics is dirty, and rabbis can’t wade in dirty water without getting dirty and undermining respect for the Torah.

Besides, few rabbis, today, are qualified to conduct affairs of state. Hardly any have engaged in serious and sustained study of classical and modern political science, which is to say the great works of statesmanship.

Of course, this is also true of the laity, but when the latter’s intellectual and moral shortcomings become manifest—a common occurrence—this does not sully Judaism like the failings of rabbis. (more…)

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